Japan Created Defensive Cyber Weapon

The Japanese equivalent of Q seems to be developing a bit of code that would act as a cyber army and trace, identify, waterboard and disable various sources of cyber-attacks. Meanwhile, WW2 treaty doesn’t say anything about that.
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According to the local media reports, development of the virtual cyber weapon has started four years ago. Since then, it has already been tested in some closed network environment. Industry experts assume that similar cyber weapons are already in use in some countries, including the United States of America and China. However, Japan has a number of legal problems deploying the weapon.

The matter is that after World War II, Japan has got a number of quite tough rules on who the country is able to invade, while there are no mentions about the use of cyberweapons. That’s why the speculations are that both the Defense Ministry and Foreign Ministry have started legislative consideration about how to use this virus. In the meantime, the Defense Ministry's Technical Research and Development Institute, which is engaged into the development of this weapon, outsourced the above mentioned project to Fujitsu. As a result, after three years the virus is ready to defend the country from all enemies, including North Korea.

The Japanese technology features the outstanding ability to trace cyber-attack sources. It is also able to find the immediate source of threats, along with the ability to "springboard" computers used to transmit the virus. The weapon disables these and gathers relevant data on the attacker. Finally, the software is able to shut down Denial-of-Service attacks and prevent the low-tech cyber attacks.