Mark Zuckerberg Private Pictures Hacked on Faceboook

It turned out that Facebook’s team of developers was fast to drop a massive clanger once it emerged that private pictures of the company’s founder, Mark Zuckerberg, could be easily accessed via his own website.

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Some online forum, bodybuilding.com, has published a step-by-step guide, demonstrating users how they could navigate past security settings which were supposed to stop Internet users from accessing private pictures.

And it looks like regardless of the claims in the exaggerated Social Network, the private photo album has proved that Mark Zuckerberg doesn’t actually live a wild life of debauchery. As opposed to the private pictures of most wealthy twenty-somethings, now there were no any embarrassing or incriminating tagged pictures featuring Zuckerberg gurning at all-night having eyes like saucers or anything like that.
Aside from a photo with President Obama, Facebook founder’s pictures were quite more mundane, with photos uploaded of him cooking meal and handing out sweets to children on Halloween about as exciting as it gets. Nevertheless, there was a picture of enthusiastic carnivore Mark Zuckerberg holding a live chicken, but people could only speculate as to whether the bird was to meet an untimely death at the hands of Zuckerberg with a passion for killing his own dinner. All users were able to check out the pictures published online.

The pictures could be accessed by fiddling around with the system letting Facebook’s users to flag material on other profiles as inappropriate. Unsurprisingly, not many people had time to get a snoop – the network developers reacted quickly by blocking access once they became aware of the embarrassing gaffe.

It seems that Facebook has attributed the mishap to a latest revision of its software, or at least it’s what it said in the interview with the Wall Street Journal. But the facts remain, and the anonymous poster slammed the network’s supposedly crack team of developers at how easy it was to hack into private material, calling it “really terrible programming on the company’s part”. The same was told by a number of industry experts and IT professionals – they all agree that it was just inexcusable, taking into account the legions of engineers and web developers working for Facebook.