GM produced 130 self-driving Chevy Bolt EV

The cost of battery packs is still believed to be the main barrier in bringing down the overall price of electric vehicles.

GM managed to bring to market the first electric car with a reasonable price (<$38,000 before incentives) with a large battery pack (60 kWh), but it’s not yet making a profit on the vehicle.
Again, the battery pack was believed to be the main out of  control expense and now we get one more indication that it is the case based on the newly disclosed list price of $15,734.29. 




While it’s not a perfect indicator of the actual cost of the battery pack, which, like much of the powertrain is made by LG Chem, it’s the best indication we have so far of its cost. LG recently ramped up its production of EV batteries to meet production constraints of its customers which include not only Chevy but Hyundai and their popular IONIQ EV and Chrysler’s Pacifica Hybrid Minivan.

GM had already disclosed that it was paying LG $145 per kWh for the battery cells of the Bolt EV. Assuming a 25% gross margin on the $262 per kWh list price, it would come down to something like a cost of $196.50 per kWh with a split of $145/kWh for the cells and $51.50/KWh at the pack level costs, which would actually make sense.

We can't expect the OEM markup on the pack to be any more significant than that considering GM confirmed losing money on the vehicle, but there are often a lot of variables in these OEM relationships based on delivery numbers/ramp/etc.


For comparison, Tesla was talking about an overall battery pack cost of less than $190 per kWh last year. The company claimed that Gigafactory would reduce that price by roughly 30% for the Model 3 when it plans to hit volume production of 35 GWh in 2018.
Most automakers and battery manufacturers are keeping the cost and specs of their battery cells and packs close to their chests and therefore, it’s interesting to see some of that information become public, however vague.

Charging is as easy as plugging in your cell phone

The great thing about Bolt EV is you can top off your battery as much or as little as you like. Or you can simply plug in at night and by the morning it’s charged up and ready to go. Without thinking, plugging in could become a part of your daily routine.   


 

240-VOLT/32-AMP CHARGING UNIT
ABOUT 25 MILES PER HOUR OF CHARGE TIME
  • The fastest way to recharge your battery at home (professional Installation required)
  • Offers more power than the standard 120-volt outlet
  • Can provide up to 25 miles of range per hour of charge time
 
DC FAST CHARGING
ABOUT 90 MILES IN AROUND 30 MINUTES OF CHARGE TIME
  • Bolt EV offers DC Fast Charging capability
  • Provides up to 90 miles of range in about 30 minutes of charge time
  • DC Fast Charging stations are available for public use
2017 Bolt EV: range details

LOCATION-BASED CHARGING
CUSTOMIZE SETTINGS TO YOUR SCHEDULE
  • Program your charge settings whether you’re home or away
  • Using the GPS signal in the car, Bolt EV will know when you’re home and will activate according to your preset times. If you’re somewhere else, Bolt EV will know to charge immediately
  • Delay charging until utility rates are at their lowest, which is usually at night while you sleep

Via Chevrolet, Electrek