World Wildlife Fund’s poster warning about Deforestation


How many endangered animals can you spot in the World Wildlife Fund’s poster warning about deforestation?


Now you see them, now you don't - a striking portrayal of animals hidden in a rain forest which could all be wiped out as a result of deforestation are revealed in a poignant poster.
The poster from wildlife campaigners WWF shows everything from a lion to an elephant which have all been skilfully concealed in a jungle vista.
The animals are camouflaged as if they are part of the tropical and lush undergrowth, but in fact what appears to be a tree trunk or vine is actually a lot more.
Hidden depths: At first glance this looks like a picturesque image of a leafy rainforest
Hidden depths: At first glance this looks like a picturesque image of a leafy rainforest
Endangered: The camouflaged animals can be seen marked with a red outline revealing those most affected by deforestation
Endangered: The camouflaged animals can be seen marked with a red outline revealing those most affected by deforestation

The poster - part of campaign to highlight the damage of deforestation - was aimed at getting the public to take a moment to consider how many animals could be lost if deforestation continues at it's current rate.
Forests still cover around 30 percent of the world's land surface but they are being felled at a rate of nearly 30 square miles a year - roughly an area the size of Panama.
 
During the past 40 years, close to 20 percent of the Amazon rain forest has been cut down more than in all the previous 450 years since European colonisation began
This poster was plastered along busy stretches of the Paris Metro underground and featured in Lonely Planet magazine.
Marine Garcia, from design agency Marcel, said four artists worked meticulously on the poster to try and conceal the animals from the public 
just enough to make them work to see them.
She said: 'The point of this poster was to let people know that deforestation does not only kill trees, it is also killing wildlife too.
'The animals are hidden because soon we might really not be able to see them again.'